Evolving Arts: New Works Festival (2008)

Evolving Arts: New Works Festival was a series of presentations based on Emory's "Evolution Revolution: Science Changing Life" symposium, Oct. 23-24, 2008, www.emory.edu/evolution. Sponsored by the Emory College of Arts and Sciences Center for Creativity & Arts, which is supported in part by the Emory University Strategic Initiative for Creativity & Arts.

Below are a few highlights from the events calendar.

Halfway to Invisible: An Exhibition by Eve Andrée Laramée

Feb. 5 - March 6 
Emory Visual Arts Gallery, 700 Peavine Creek Dr. 

Halfway to Invisible, an installation by Eve Andrée Laramée, raises questions about the environmental legacy of uranium mining for atomic weapons and nuclear power, and its biological impact on the peoples of the American West. Between 1949 and 1989, uranium mines in the Western United States produced more than 225,000,000 tons of uranium ore. This activity affected a large number of Native American nations, including the Navajo, Laguna, Zuni, Southern Ute, Ute Mountain, Hopi, Acoma and other Pueblo cultures.

Theater Studies Colloquia with playwrights Kenneth Weitzman, John Walch, and Matthew Maguire
Thursday, February 17, 4-5 p.m.

Theater Lab, Schwartz CenterJoin the three "Emory Evolving Arts: New Works Festival" playwrights as they have a discussion about their process and experiences. Open to the public.

Brave New Works Reading of The Fifth Great Ape by Kenneth Weitzman & Out of Hand Theater, Directed by Ariel de Man 

Friday, Feb. 20 
7:00 p.m. 
Theater Lab, Schwartz Center 

This collaboratively-generated theater piece is based on primate (and human) social behaviors; the work explores our true nature through our closest relatives in the primate family and offers new ideas and questions about power, sex, violence, kindness, and morality.

The presentation will be followed by a panel of Emory Science Faculty.

Commissioned by and developed with the support of Playwriting Center of Theater Emory and the Creative Writing Program at Emory University, Atlanta GA. This project is sponsored in part by a grant from the Emory College Center of Creativity & Arts. This reading is co-sponsored by Emory's Program in Science & Society.

Brave New Works Reading of Wax Wings by Matthew Maguire and Dr. Tatiana's Sex Advice to All Creation, based on the book by Olivia Judson, adapted by John Walch

Saturday, Feb. 21 
5:00 p.m. 
Theater Lab, Schwartz Center 

Wax Wings, by Matthew Maguire. Two teams of scientists working on the science of evolution have to set aside their pure research when they find common cause in confronting an epidemic.

Dr. Tatiana's Sex Advice to All Creation, based on the book by Olivia Judson, adapted by John Walch. This project is to be a musical adaptation of the book.

Commissioned by and developed with the support of Playwriting Center of Theater Emory and the Creative Writing Program at Emory University, Atlanta GA. This project is sponsored in part by a grant from the Emory College Center of Creativity & Arts.

Faculty and Guest Artist Dance Concert featuring How the Human Got Its Big Head by Faculty member Lori Teague and Big Eater (heart of glass) by New York choreographer David Neumann

Feb. 26-28 
8:00 p.m. 
Dance Studio, Schwartz Center 

Faculty member Lori Teague and New York choreographer David Neumann present works inspired by Emory's symposium Evolution Revolution.

Of her new work, Lori Teague says: "How the Human Got Its Big Head looks at humans at our worst and at our best. It frames what is most important about our evolution, which is the acceptance of change, variation and difference. We pass through a number of stages of morality as we mature, and we mature over a lifetime, just as we are adapting. And so we are, in our best light, shedding our prejudices. Now that's evolution. Equally fascinating are the complex traits that influence our survival-traits like fear, arrogance, greed and hate. How do these dynamics impose a reality on the life span of any species? I wonder if we can imagine our own extinction. This is an important story of interrelatedness. All "other things," things that we might define as having more power or speed, heightened senses or energy, even more access to food than us, are probably just six degrees away from Kevin Bacon. And if attraction, desire, and curiosity draw us closer to "other things," it is inevitable that two different beings will collide or connect and produce variation."

Of his new work, David Neumann says: "Big Eater (heart of glass) was made while under a spell lit by the profound beauty of Darwin's ideas. And also by the terrifying power and complexity of the mind of the species that can articulate them. I work with the body--a body that can illustrate parts of the mind that words cannot. And yet, what are words but symbols born of mind, articulated by parts of the body? BIG EATER speaks, jumps, shouts and glares---all a part of the larger dance we make between other minds and bodies, while having a crack, a shot, a stab, a go at recognizing patterns beneath the fray."

Organized by the Emory College Center for Creativity & Arts (CCA). Funded by the Emory University Creativity & Arts Strategic Initiative (C&A)